Stanley Fish on Separation of Church and State

by Mar 7, 2012Culture1 comment

A quick must-read.

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1 Comment
  1. Todd

    Mr. Fish mentions Thomas Jefferson in his post, whose pen is used by scores for what inevitably Jefferson was opposed to, namely the separation of Church (religion) from Government (the individuals thereof). This proposal is a gross addition to the words carefully penned through revisions and sent in response to the Danbury Baptists. His own editing seems to ooze a clear adherence to the duties of his national office endowed by the constitution while maintaining his notable deep religious (though erroneous) endeavors. The constitution protects from infringement of government into our religious practices in addition to preventing a state established church. Jefferson made it clear that the religious pursuits of the governed must be protected from the intrusion of government. Not the opposite.

    http://www.loc.gov/loc/lcib/9806/danpost.html

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