Kevin Bauder, Not Exactly a Doomsday Prophet, On the Coming Dark Age

by Sep 13, 2013ChurchLife, Culture2 comments

We have been living in the daylight—that is, in a civilization that has been shaped largely by biblical perspectives and norms. We are about to plunge into the night. We are at the door of a Dark Age….

Christians must not view themselves as Moses, leading a nation into the promised land. They must not even view themselves as Elijah, calling a chosen people to repentance. They must view themselves as Mordecai or Daniel, as exiles in a brutal and foreign land—just as they should have all along.

—Kevin Bauder

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2 Comments

  1. Philip Larson

    Just wondering why we must not use Moses or Elijah as our model, but rather Mordecai or Daniel “as exiles in a brutal and foreign land.” I see the “exile,” or “stranger” theme often used, but there seem to be instances in which such “strangers,” such as Isaac and David, seem to be far from fitting the stereotype of “stranger.” Furthermore, I wonder if Mordecai or Daniel are our best models unless we also are under God’s judgment, as God’s people. Just seems to be a lot of carelessness.

    Reply
  2. Mark L Ward Jr

    Good call, Phil. I’ll have to give this some thought.

    That, of course, is not what blogs are for. They’re for instant publishing gratification.

    But it is what commenters are for. Thank you for serving that role.

    Reply

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