An Arresting Metaphor

by Feb 9, 2010Culture, Mission1 comment

J. Gresham Machen, in “Christianity and Culture,” Princeton Theological Review, Vol. 11, 1913.

The elimination of the supernatural in Christianity—so tremendously common today—really makes Christianity merely natural. Christianity becomes a human product, a mere part of human culture. But as such it is something entirely different from the old Christianity that was based upon a direct revelation from God. Deprived thus of its note of authority, the gospel is no gospel any longer; it is a cheque for untold millions—but without the signature at the bottom.

The other day I heard again—this time from evangelical Greek scholar Dan Wallace—the only explanation I’ve ever heard for why so many liberal theologians would bother to study and write about Scripture when they have already eliminated the supernatural: they’re practically all former evangelicals who want to liberate others from the deceit they feel they grew up under. That’s sadly the case with Bart Ehrman, for example.

Machen, thankfully, didn’t give in when he was attracted to liberalism. A divine signature was at the bottom of every page in his Bible.

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1 Comment
  1. Todd

    Many fear receiving the labels of “pentecostal” and “charismatic” for attempting to speak of the supernatural in our lives though we all know of our hopelessness without divine intervention and sanctification.

    Reply

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