How Science Fiction Found Religion by Benjamin A. Plotinsky, City Journal Winter 2009

by Mar 6, 2009Culture0 comments

Popular art both reflects and forges popular culture. Science is the ultimate authority for so many in the West, so it shows up in movies.

“The Force” is one detail in which the new [Star Wars] films are actually less spiritual than the old. In the 1977 movie, Obi-Wan described this mysterious entity as “what gives a Jedi his power. It’s an energy field created by all living things; it surrounds us, penetrates us; it binds the galaxy together.” In the 1980 sequel, Yoda . . . instructed Luke to “feel the Force around you: here, between you, me, the tree, the rock, everywhere!” Such language, smacking of the period’s flirtation with natural mysticism, gave way in the new movies to an explanation more in keeping with our current fascination with molecular biology: the Force, we learned in The Phantom Menace [1999], was actually the product of microorganisms in the blood. It’s as though Lucas, instinctively realizing the intellectual poverty of the New Age, gave it up, exchanged it for something resembling science.

[From How Science Fiction Found Religion by Benjamin A. Plotinsky, City Journal Winter 2009]

The above comes from an interesting article about popular works of science fiction and their clear parallels to (or pilferings from?) the Christian Message. I don’t recommend watching all the movies it mentions. Those who watch the culture must maintain a healthy fear of their fallenness. But that’s another post.

Read More 

Review: The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self

Review: The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self

The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self: Cultural Amnesia, Expressive Individualism, and the Road to Sexual Revolution by Carl R. Trueman.My rating: 5 of 5 stars I'm hoping to publish in a journal a more extensive review of this excellent—though long and at times...

Don’t Tell Young Women in Your Church to Avoid College

Don’t Tell Young Women in Your Church to Avoid College

There’s a young man I know from Christian circles somewhere in the U.S.—I’ll call him Kyle or Gerald or Edward, or maybe something a little more derogatory—who posted what I can only call an anti-girls-going-to-college meme on Facebook. It argued that Christian...

Bavinck: A Critical Biography by James Eglinton

Bavinck: A Critical Biography by James Eglinton

Bavinck: A Critical Biography My rating: 5 of 5 starsHerman Bavinck's fame as a theologian has been steadily growing in my circles—especially since the Dutch Translation Society began putting out his Reformed Dogmatics in English in 2003. All four volumes sit proudly...

Leave a comment.

0 Comments

Leave a Reply