Insight

by Feb 26, 2010Books2 comments

An insightful comment on economics applying to all disciplines from Paul Collier, Oxford prof and author of The Bottom Billion:

Part of the reason single-factor theories about development failure are so common is that modern academics tend to specialize: they are trained to produce intense but narrow beams of light.

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2 Comments
  1. Todd Jones

    Whereas postmodernism’s “There is nothing without context” really does have a contextually valid point…

    Great find. Are you connecting this with your earlier post on the insufficiency of secular reasoning?

    Reply
  2. Mark L Ward Jr

    I didn’t have a connection in mind, but certainly there are a few.

    Secularists and Christians both admit that man is limited, but they offer different ultimate reasons for that limitation—and different prospects for lessening it.

    Reply

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